Nationalism cannot save remnants of Scottish steel industry

October 28, 2015 at 3:44 pm (capitalism, internationalism, posted by JD, scotland, solidarity, unions, workers)

General view of the Tata steel factory in Cambuslang. Pic: DR

By Ann Field (at Workers Liberty)

Two hundred and seventy jobs are directly at risk after Tata Steel announced plans to “mothball” its Dalzell and Clydebridge plants, the final remnants of the Scottish steel industry after the Tories’ de-industrialisation of the 1980s.

Hundreds more jobs in local communities which depend on the plants and their workforces are also at risk.

The Scottish Labour Party has responded with a range of slightly confusing demands on the SNP government in Holyrood:

– Use public procurement powers to ensure that Scottish infrastructure projects place orders with the two plants.

– Support short-time working (but Tata, not the Scottish government, is the employer).

– Temporarily bring the plants into public ownership (but why only “temporarily”?).

– Cut Tata’s energy costs by putting pressure on Scottish Power and SSE (but why can’t we all have cheaper electricity?);

– Consult with “workers and the industry” to develop a government-led steel strategy (but why allow Tata to be involved if the industry is to be taken into public ownership?);

– Provide support for those who will soon be out of a job (which suggests a certain lack of confidence in the other demands).

Scottish Labour also demands action because of the “iconic” status of the Scottish steel industry. This is not a persuasive argument. Razor-gangs in Glasgow on a Saturday night also once enjoyed an “iconic” status. But this hardly justified their preservation.

However confused and inconsistent such demands might be, they reflect a genuine commitment to try to protect jobs in the residual Scottish steel industry. Local CLPs have also been campaigning on the streets to save steelworkers’ jobs.

SNP First Minister Nicola Sturgeon visited the two plants last week. A government-led taskforce has been set up to try to find an alternative buyer for the plants. According to Sturgeon, “nothing is off the table”, including public ownership.

The SNP, Scotland’s patriotic party, can hardly point to its record of supporting Scottish steel jobs. In 2012 it awarded all steel contracts for the new Forth crossing to China, Poland and Spain. Not a single one went to Dalzell or Clydebridge.

While any steps to save jobs are to be welcomed, more is needed than either Scottish Labour or the SNP are currently proposing.

And far more is certainly needed than anything the notoriously right-wing leadership of the Community trade union – the biggest union in the steel industry – has to offer by way of a ‘campaign’.

The job losses in the west of Scotland are part of a bigger wave of job losses in the British steel industry, hitting Tata workers in Scunthorpe, SSI workers in Redcar, and workers employed by Caparo Industries.

Jobs have also been lost or are now at risk in the steel industry throughout Europe and elsewhere – including China. These losses are a product of the unregulated and globalised nature of steel production and supply.

China and other major steel-producing countries (such as South Korea, India and Russia) have massively increased steel output in recent years, while global demand has been stagnant or declining.

The result is a typical capitalist crisis of overproduction. But, in the context of a globalised economy, it is a crisis on an international scale: in line with the logic of capitalism, excess steel output is sold cut-price (‘dumped’) in the international marketplace.

One ‘answer’ to globalisation – whether it be in the steel industry or any other industry – is nationalism: Put the blame on a particular country (in this case: China), demand controls on imports from that country, and retreat behind tariff barriers, national borders and trade wars.

This is the often unspoken ‘logic’ at the heart of the SNP’s demand for independence.

But why, in an independent Scotland, would the steel industry, with a current workforce of less than 300, be better able to compete against the more than 800 million tons of steel produced each year by China, and the 100,000 workforce of the biggest Chinese steel company alone?

The socialist answer to the anarchy of capitalist production – which produces too little of what people need, and too much of what can find a buyer in the marketplace – is not economic autarky, when states and nations try to wall themselves off from the world market and strive for economic self-sufficiency.

Our answer is the socialisation of the means of production: democratic planning; production to meet need not profit; work-sharing with no loss of pay; and environment-friendly production processes.

This campaign to saves jobs in the steel industry throughout the UK should be a part of an international campaign which brings together steelworkers and their unions to fight for such demands, backed up by industrial action.

The labour movement unites workers across national borders. Nationalism divides workers according to their national identities. In the fight to save steelworkers’ jobs – whatever their country, and whatever their national identity – the labour movement internationally must take the lead.

7 Comments

  1. Glasgow Working Class said,

    It should be Ta Ta Steel. The debate in the Commons today was a disgrace and the blame game being distributed from each side. If the steel works are to continue they need orders from business and ignore the EU.

    • Jim Denham said,

      The EU is not the cause of the steel industry’s problems, or a barrier to state intervention, as the success of the German steel industry proves: it’s an excuse for inaction by the government.

      • Glasgow Working Class said,

        So what action do you suggest Jim. Labour did not help and neither will the Tories. If contracts have to go out to tender and the British play the EU rules then steelworks are finished. Do you think the Germans adhere strictly to the rules?

      • Jim Denham said,

        EU rules *do* allow for social, economic and environmental factors to be taken into account when procurement decisions are being made and when state aid is required to protect industries, but the Tories and the SNP have used “EU rules” as an excuse for inaction. This was made clear over Bombadier train manufacturing in Derby in 2011 when the Tories used this excuse over the loss of 14,000 when they chose to award the Thameslink contract to Siemens) and again over the SNP’s recent decision to sell off Scottish Water to Anglian water, citing “EU rules” whereas even the pro-independence Rise organisation showed that EU procurement laws did not require the Scottish government to do this. Similarly, the Tories have taken a conscious decision not to attempt to negotiate with Brussels over state aid for the UK steel industry (which would almost certainly have been allowed), but to let the industry collapse and then blame “EU rules” for their lack of intervention. It’s an old Tory trick, but the anti-EU “left” fall for it every time.

  2. Political Tourist said,

    Unionists fail to save Scottish Steel.
    Cilla Black moment.
    Surprise Surprise

    • Glasgow Working Class said,

      Nat sis fail in education and industry but take their salaries. AYE. Wasters but the Jocks will wake up as they eventually do. YAWN.

      • Political Tourist said,

        Eat your cereal.

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