RIP Nicholas Winton

July 1, 2015 at 11:21 pm (anti-fascism, Anti-Racism, good people, history, humanism, posted by JD)

 

Nicholas Winton with one of the children he rescued during the second world war.

Gene (of Harry’s Place) writes:

I hope the life and achievements of Nicholas Winton, who died at the age of 106, are getting full recognition in the British media.

Winton was belatedly recognized for his role in helping to rescue and find families for at least 669 Jewish children from Nazi-controlled Czechoslovakia in the months before the outbreak of World War II.

“I called myself Honorary Secretary of the Children’s Section of the British Committee for Refugees from Czechoslovakia,” Mr. Winton told The Washington Post in 1989. “The other people,” he added, referring to government bureaucrats and others confronted with his doggedness, “they just called me a bloody nuisance.”

…He wrote letters to government leaders around the world, including in the United States. Nearly all of them turned down his requests for assistance. “If America had only agreed to take them, too,” he said, “I could have saved at least 2,000 more.”

Sweden agreed to take in some of the young refugees, as did Britain — provided that Mr. Winton could identify families willing to care for the children until they were 17 years old. The government also required that he secure the staggering sum of 50 pounds per child for their eventual return home.

Many of the children would lose their parents in the Nazi death camps and had no home to return to after the war.

While holding down his job at the stock exchange and with help from assistants, including his mother, Mr. Winton gathered or forged travel documents for the children, raised the necessary funds and recruited host families through newspaper advertisements and other means.

I was especially touched to learn that one of the children he rescued was Karel Reisz, who grew up to direct two of my very favorite movies: Who’ll Stop the Rain and Sweet Dreams.

1 Comment

  1. Political tourist said,

    Probably about the best there is in human nature.
    This man saw the danger and tried to help.
    There was also the Japanese diplomat who tried everything to help.
    As he left Eastern Europe on the final day he was throwing visas out the train window.

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