To the scabs of the Morning Star, Socialist Worker and Counterfire

March 14, 2011 at 12:07 am (africa, Human rights, Jim D, Middle East, workers)

From Jim Denham, on behalf of the Libyan resistance, to the “anti-imperialist” Brit “left”:

The Scab
by Jack London,
(1876-1916)

 


After God had finished the rattlesnake, the toad, and the vampire, he had some awful substance left with which he made a scab.A scab is a two-legged animal with a corkscrew soul, a water brain, a combination backbone of jelly and glue.                

Where others have hearts, he carries a tumor of rotten principles.
When a scab comes down the street, men turn their backs and angels weep in heaven, and the devil shuts the gates of hell to keep him out.
No man (or woman) has a right to scab so long as there is a pool of water to drown his carcass in, or a rope long enough to hang his body with.
Judas was a gentleman compared with a scab.
 
 For betraying his master, he had character enough to hang himself. A scab has not.
Esau sold his birthright for a mess of pottage.
Judas sold his Savior for thirty pieces of silver.
Benedict Arnold sold his country for a promise of a commision in the british army.
 
 The scab sells his birthright, country, his wife, his children and his fellow men for an unfulfilled promise from his employer.
Esau was a traitor to himself; Judas was a traitor to his God; Benedict Arnold was a traitor to his country.
 
 A scab is a traitor to his God, his country, his family and his class.
Author — Jack London (1876-1916)
 
 
 

5 Comments

  1. jim denham said,

    A scab (over at ‘Socialist Unity’) writes:

    161.Some of the SWP-orientated contributions to this thread seem to be at odds with the actual analysis put forward (in discussion and in Socialist Worker) which takes account of the material basis of the Ghadaffi regime’s support and of the doubtful revolutionary credentials of some of the insurgents newly acquired leaders.

    This seems a shame as, even after its most recent schisms, the ‘heritage’ SWP seemed to have retained some of its recently acquired maturity in handling the complexities of contemporary imperialism and of inter-imperialist rivalry.

    Understanding the contemporary role of imperialism has traditionally been the weakness of the utltra-left and it is not surprising that the newer adherents of ‘state-capitalist’ theory might find it hard to keep up.

    The events in Libya can certainly be classified as an insurrection but its chances of both success and of it leading to profound revolutionary change depend on the balance of class forces and the extent to which the intervention of competing imperialist powers can be prevented.

    As Socialist Worker correctly points out “If the revolution allies itself with Western imperialism it will lose credibility among Libyans and the rest of the Arab world.”

    John G seems to think, that in asserting that the Libyan events are ‘part of the Arab revolution sweeping across the region’ that he has absolved himself of the necessity to grasp the actual nature of the contradictions within these processes.

    The points made by Calvin have the virtue that they deal with the actual concrete situation.

    Comment by Nick Wright — 14 March, 2011 @ 5:08 pm

  2. resistor said,

    How appropriate for Denham to quote Jack London who also said, . “I am first of all a white man, and only then a socialist” for Denham is a Zionist first and last.

  3. charliethechulo said,

    …just as “resister” is an anti-Jewish racist, first and last,

  4. The Arab spring/Spanish echoes « Poumista said,

    […] analogies: The Morning Star: those wonderful folks who brought you the Molotov-Ribbentrop pact / From Jack London to the scabs of the Morning Star, Socialist Worker and Counterfire. Dale Street also notes George Galloway’s Stalinism: In his semi-autobiographical work […]

  5. SteveH said,

    Where is Modernity to righteously slag off Denham for using a known racist as his source? Does Jim not realise that by quoting London he is evoking far right racism?

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