Wagner 200 on Radio 3

May 18, 2013 at 12:02 am (anti-semitism, Asshole, BBC, drama, fascism, Germany, Jim D, music, Racism, song, wireless)

BBC Radio 3 starts a week of Wagner in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the composer’s birth.

It begins with:

Wagner In Zurich: 12.15, Saturday 18 May 
Tom Service travels to Zurich, where Richard Wagner the revolutionary lived in exile for nine years, and finds a city which played a crucial  role in the development of the composer’s thinking and provided fertile  ground for his Ring Cycle, and which is marking the 200th anniversary  with a festival including a new musical theatre piece by the director  Hans Neuenfels. Tom visits the home of the Wesendonck family, where Wagner was inspired to write Tristan und Isolde and his Wesendonck Lieder, and also the idyllic Tribschen district of Lucerne, where Wagner later lived and composed his Siegfried Idyll as a birthday gift to his second wife, Cosima. It was from Germany’s 1848 revolutions that Wagner had fled to  Switzerland, and from Leipzig, Wagner’s birthplace and a city which is  central to this year’s anniversary celebrations, the BBC’s Berlin correspondent Stephen Evans reports on the composer’s controversial place in German culture today.

 Other highlights:

Saturday Classics: 3.00pm, Saturday 18 May  
The great English operatic bass Robert Lloyd joins Radio 3′s celebration of the 200th anniversary of Wagner’s birth with selections from his favourite Wagner operas.
Mastersingers of Nuremberg
Duration: 58 minutes: 1.00pm, Sunday 19 May  
Immortalised by Wagner in his famous opera, Lucie Skeaping looks back on the life and music of the real Hans Sachs and his fellow Mastersingers in 17th Century Germany.
Wagner and His World
At 12.00 pm throughout the week Donald Macleod explores the connections and relationships that helped establish Wagner as the most revolutionary musical thinker of the 19th century.  Includes:

Beethoven 1/5 Donald Macleod explores how Beethoven’s music heavily influenced Wagner: Monday 20 May
Weber and Bellini  2/5 Donald Macleod explores Wagner’s early love for the operas of Weber and Bellini: Tuesday 21 May
Meyerbeer and Palestrina 3/5 Donald Macleod explores how Wagner first cherished, then rejected, Meyerbeer’s influence: Wednesday 22 May
Liszt. 4/5 Donald Macleod explores the relationship between Wagner and Liszt: Thursday 23 May

One Winter’s Afternoon
8.00 pm, Sunday 19 May
The story of the great operatic rivalry between Guiseppe Verdi and Richard Wagner in the year marking the bicentenary of their births. In real life, the two great composers never met.

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There’s no denying the fact that Richard Wagner wrote some sublime music. But never forget this, either:

Wagner was a vicious anti-Semite and it permeated his music. The Mastersingers of Nuremberg was Adolph Hitler’s favourite opera, as Wagner enthusiast Paul Mason recently pointed out.

3 Comments

  1. Roger McCarthy (@RF_McCarthy) said,

    I could write a far longer and more detailed indictment myself but still love Wagner’s music.

    In art the more odoriferous the dungheap the more beautiful and precious the flowers that bloom briefly on it.

    • Jim Denham said,

      “I could write a far longer and more detailed indictment myself but still love Wagner’s music”…

      …You’re always welcome to send us a post, Roger.

  2. Alun Howard said,

    Thanks for the info. Vicious antisemite but not explicit in his operas (any more than its explicit in the actually Nazi Pfitzner’s Palestrina). And Wagner was also asocialist at one point. I think the issue of life and art is complex, and I’d hope it would be possible to separate them a bit. Shakespeare was much more explicitly antisemitic in Merchant of Venice. Hitler was a vegetarian whose favourite composer was Lehar. Most top ranking Nazis were bored by Wagner. Beethoven’s music was also tainted. Etc etc.

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