Louis Armstrong’s greetings to the Irish

March 17, 2013 at 4:49 pm (black culture, comedy, culture, good people, humanism, internationalism, Ireland, jazz, Jim D, multiculturalism, music, surrealism)

On St Patrick’s Day, we bring you perhaps the most bizarre lyric ever sung by Louis Armstrong: “I was born in Ireland (Ha, Ha)”…

Louis Armstrong And His Hot Five, November 1926: Irish Black Bottom

Louis’s tireless biographer Ricky Riccardi writes:

Admittedly, this is not songwriting as its finest but as a novelty, it’s good fun. The “black bottom” was a popular dance of the 1920s so this tune humorously pretends that it’s also taken Ireland by storm.  If Louis had to record something so silly in the 1950s, critics would scream at the producers for forcing it on him.  But “Irish Black Bottom” was written by the aforementioned Percy Venable so more than likely, it was a staple of Louis’s act at the Sunset.  And can’t you imagine Louis bringing down the house with that vocal?  That “ha, ha” he gives after singing “And I was born in Ireland,” breaks me up every time.  I can only imagine what it did to the audiences who heard him do it live. 

The song begins with the funny sound of Louis and his Hot Five swinging through a sample of the Irish classic “Where the River Shannon Flows” before Louis swings out with the main melody, which is predominantly in a minor mode until the end. Louis’s lead sounds great and Dodds is bouncing around as usual but trombonist Hy Clark, a substitute for Kid Ory, sounds hesitant and doesn’t add much.  After a chorus and an interlude by pianist Lil Armstrong, Louis takes the vocal.  If you can’t make it out, here’s what he says:

All you heard for years in Ireland,
was the “Wearin’ Of The Green”,
but the biggest change that’s come in Ireland
I have ever seen.
All the laddies and the cooies
laid aside their Irish reels,
and I was born in Ireland
(Ha, Ha), so imagine how I feels.

Now Ireland’s gone Black Bottom crazy,
see them dance,
you ought to see them dance.
Folks supposed to be related, even dance,
I mean they dance.
They play that strain,
works right on their brain.
Now it goes Black Bottom,
a new rhythm’s drivin’ the folks insane.
I hand you no Blarney, when I say
that song really goes,
and they put it over with a wow,
I mean now.
All over Ireland
you can see the people dancin’ it,
’cause Ireland’s gone Black Bottom crazy now

I don’t know how you can’t get swept up in that offering. Armstrong doesn’t so much sing it as shout it, or talk it, but his spirit sure gets the message across (though sometimes, he’s so far from the written melody, it sounds like he’s singing a different song on top of Lil’s chording on the piano). After the vocal, Clark and Dodds take forgettable short solos and breaks before Louis carries the troops home with brio.  Louis’s lip trill towards the end is particularly violent and right before his closing breaks, he dips into his bag for a favorite phrases, one that ended both “You’re Next” and “Big Fat Ma and Skinny Pa.”  The concluding break is so perfect in its phrasing and choice of notes that I believe it might have already been set in stone by Pops during his live performances of the tune at the Sunset.  Either way, that’s no reason to criticize him; it’s a perfect ending and puts an emphatic stamp on a very entertaining record.

That’s all for now. Have a happy St. Patrick’s day and don’t forget to mix in a little Louis with your Guiness.  I hand you no blarney, it’s a great combination…

2 Comments

  1. Robin Carmody said,

    Better than House of Pain or Macklemore & Ryan Lewis’s “Irish Celebration”, at the very least.

  2. Jim Denham said,

    There are few jazz performances with an Irish theme. But here’s another:

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