Greece: trying to understand Syriza

May 14, 2012 at 10:41 am (capitalist crisis, democracy, elections, Europe, Greece, reblogged)

As the anti-austerity left party Syriza seems to have a real chance of winning the second Greek election, the BBC’s Paul Mason gives the best analysis I’ve yet come across, of the history and ideology of this hybrid outfit:

This is less of a blog more of a series of notes to try and enhance understanding of who SYRIZA and its leader Alexis Tsipras actually are, and how they might behave if, as polls suggest, they become the winning party in a second Greek general election. I’ve been troubled by the lack of historical depth in most of the profiles published in newspapers; and of course my own knowledge is limited to English sources. I’ve checked this with two authoritative Greek sources. It should go up on my BBC blog soon. Get ready to hear about parties and political currents that most commentators believed were insignificant just a few years ago:

SYRIZA is an acronym signifying “Coalition of the Radical Left”. It’s key component is a party called Synaspismos, itself an umbrella group of the far left in Greece.

Alexis Tsipras is the 38 year old leader of the Synaspismos party, and rose to prominence as its candidate for the mayor of Athens in 2006. Tsipras originated from the youth wing of the Communist Party, the KKE.

Greek communism, like most of western communism after the 1970s, was split into two hostile parties: the KKE of the “interior” and that of the “exterior” – the latter denoting a Moscow-oriented party, the former denoting a Euro-communist, more parliamentary and socially liberal agenda.

Initially Synaspismos was the electoral alliance between the two KKEs. But in the early 1990s the main Moscow-oriented KKE quit the alliance, purging about 45% of its members, who then stayed inside Synaspismos with the Eurocommunists. These included Tsipras.

Synaspismos then evolved in an interesting direction. Reacting to the rise of the anti-globalisation movement, first of all the party itself became a highly diverse left umbrella group: of Eurocommunists, left-social Democrats, far leftists, and ecologists. It played a significant role in mobilizations against summits, beginning in Genoa 2001 and beyond. Meanwhile the main KKE remained a traditional Communist party, rooted in public sector and manual trade unions.

Then, in the 2004 election, Synaspismos came together with other small parties to form SYRIZA. These included a split-off from the British SWP, a split off from the main Communist Party and another group of eco-leftists…

Read the rest here

H-t: Roger

3 Comments

  1. representingthemambo said,

    Reblogged this on Representing the Mambo and commented:
    Linked to this a couple of days ago but definitely worth another look. I think it’s important to understand Syriza and how they would represent such a massive ideologcal break with recent European political history. One does of course worry that if Syriza tried to carry out their programme how the European ‘elite’ would respond.

  2. brucerob said,

    Paul Mason makes use of the concept of the workers’ government in analysing Syriza’s prospects. Never know when a Trotskyist training and knowledge of the early Comintern will come in useful.

  3. Clive said,

    He gets it wrong, though, doesn’t he?

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