The vilest abuse by the vilest church

November 27, 2009 at 12:03 am (Catholicism, Champagne Charlie, hell, Ireland, religion)

All religions are an insult to humanity and involve the mental abuse of children. Not all, however, involve their physical abuse. Or the systematic coverering-up of that abuse by a confessional state controlled by that religion. By the 1980’s the Catholic heirarchy in Ireland and in Rome knew about the child abuse. Their response: to take out insurance against possible claims from victims! This church and its leaders are beneath contempt: they and their filthy religion deserve to rot in the hell they believe in.
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Here’s what one survivor, Colm O’ Gorman,  now a successful author and activist with Amnesty International, has to say : 
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An op ed I wrote for the Irish Daily Star which was published today. The report was published this afternoon. More to follow on the report later. It can be downloaded here. Even after the Ryan report last May and the Ferns Report in 2005, the contents of the Dublin Diocese report, the scale of the cover-up, will shock Irish society.  Bishops in Dublin colluded with child abusers, protecting them and hiding them, enabling them to prey on the innocent. Children were deliberately sacrificed to protect the Church. Dozens of priests and members of the clergy were involved.  Worst… [Read more]

Posted by Colm on Thursday, November 26, 2009 at 6:49 pm 
Filed under Blog, Human Rights · Tagged , , , , , ,

8 Comments

  1. Joe Litobarski said,

    “This church and its leaders are beneath contempt: they and their filthy religion deserve to rot in the hell they believe in.”

    Come on, that’s absurd! This is a cartoon version of Catholicism you’re attacking.

  2. LBU said,

    Yeah, everyone’s laughing mate.

  3. shug said,

    There is nothing new in this report .Many countries have had folowers of the holly sea, come forward with these claims of abuse by the churches representatives, and unfortuanatly those claimants in most were the vundrable, orphans and state wards.

    When looked into by the authorities the perpetrators of these historical crimes are either retired or infirm, and when prosecuted appear pathetic shells of humanity who seek forgivness and redemtion.And Rome does a Ponsious Pillot.

  4. Matt said,

    Ireland is very different to the other countries shug is talking about.

    Historically, the Church has held a position in Irish society quite different to other European countries like Spain or Italy. Whereas there it was a privileged layer, living off the peasantry as a parasitic landlord, in Ireland it was outlawed by the English colonisers who then imposed their own Anglican church. The prestige it thus gained in the eyes of the Irish people, taking part in revolts against English rule and relief efforts during the famine, meant that anti-clericalism did not develop as a strand in politics as it did elsewhere in Europe and after independence in 1921 it was able to assume a dominant role in the new Free State.

    That dominant position not only allowed it to abuse countless children for decades but also meant that until very recently none of its victims could look for justice to an Irish State that stood in awe of it.

    The same mixture we see in the Irish Church – narrow nationalism, historical bitterness, romanticism about an often falsified history, material and intellectual poverty and repressed sexuality – is, unsurprisingly, very much the human material from which twentieth century Irish republicanism was constructed.

  5. Rosie said,

    Good piece over here:-

    http://heresycorner.blogspot.com/2009/11/abuse-of-catholicism.html

    Matt – yes, effectively Ireland was a theocracy when it gained its independence. The great thing about being a theocrat is that ordinary criminality doesn’t apply to you if you are one of the apparatchiks of the ruling holy order. Similar things occur in other theocracies eg Iran. The Iranian basij will target pretty young women to manhandle at demonstrations.

    It was one of George Bernard Shaw’s themes, about how one of the great evils of British rule was the strengthening of the power of the Church, with its book banning, narrow culture social conservatism and ability to meddle with ordinary lives at parish level, so misbehaving girls could be sent off as slave labour in laundries, for instance.

    Then he went off to Stalin’s USSR and one of the things he found to praise was that a career could be open to people from a poor background via the Communist Party, just as in the Roman Catholic Church. So you could become a member of the ruling class without having to be born in it. Of course you abused your power as much as any lord with droit de seigneur.

  6. asquith said,

    Has anything been heard from the likes of Eagleton, Bunting etc. on the matter.

    Someone should read their output. Because I really fucking don’t want to.

    I agree with Rosie- I hail that Heresy Corner article & think it should be seen.

  7. Dr Paul said,

    How Irish nationalism shot intself in the foot, part 94. A report in the Guardian yesterday pointed out that the British occupying regime in Ireland introduced a non-denominational education system — presumably to reduce the power of the Catholic church in Ireland and increase the hold of the occupation, as this was not done here in Britain, and still isn’t official policy! — and that the quest for Catholic education thus became a central plank for Irish nationalism.

  8. shug said,

    Just a point Mat,my mother Irish catholic my father Glasgow athiest.Myself educated by the Brotherhood the Jesuits.I do not see to many disimilarities between the Scot catholic education and upbringing than that of Ireland.Mind you come July in Glasgow one could be forgiven if one thought they where in Ireland.

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